Canada’s Most Important Challenge to Healthcare

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“There was no difference between men, in intelligence or race, so profound as the difference between the sick and the well.” – The Great Gatsby 

What is the best way to run our health care system? Is it privatized? Hybrid? Or, Public?

Right now, in British Columbia Dr. Brian Day is challenging the very way we fund essential health care services. He argues that the province’s ban on the purchase of private insurance for essential medical procedures is unconstitutional. As the ban requires many patients to endure gruelling wait times, thereby exacerbating their medical conditions. The trial is predicted to go for 6 months.

Eventually, the case will be appealed to the Court of Appeal and then to the Supreme Court of Canada (its true destination). The Supreme Court of Canada’s decision will have national ramifications, and may change the way we fund health care across the country.

“Dr. Day argues that Canada’s inefficient system is the product of a wasteful bureaucracy, a lack of competition and a misguided attachment to universal coverage.”

Although it could be said that a lack of competition has fostered a lower level of customer service from doctors, this lack of competition has allowed the government to keep health care costs down. Doctors are prevented from charging too much, and the costs of administration are controlled.

Regardless of how this case resolves, I predict that a hybrid system for essential medical services will continue to creep in. Technology is eroding the boundaries of provincial control, the baby boomer generation is aging, and the economy feels as unstable as ever. All of these conditions are creating a time of uncertainty and are paving the way for change.

I personally have huge concerns about the erosion of the public health care system. The ramifications of which will be felt by the most marginalized.

Poor. Rich. White. Black. Jewish. Christian. Criminal. Saint. Heterosexual. Homosexual. No matter how we identify or are identified, we are all entitled to health care. And not just any health care, but good health care.

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