The Case of the Stolen Jewellery

kim_kardashian_portrait_2009

This week Kim Kardashian made headlines. It went far beyond her normal headlines. She was robbed. In the middle of the night. In a foreign city. In a secluded hotel. In a shocking manner. Most likely by a gang of organized criminals. The execution: perfect. The legal remedy: predictable.

So who might she sue?

First, she can sue the hotel for failing to have adequate security measures and by creating a situation of danger. Then she can sue the hotel’s employees for failing to take proper care of her and by allowing danger to unfold.

Second, she can sue her own security team for failing to properly watch her or perhaps for breach of contract (depending on the terms). Rumour has it, her security team left her completely unattended as they guarded her sisters in a nightclub.

Third, she can sue her own insurer if they refuse to reimburse her for the stolen jewellery (assuming she has insurance).

Fourth, assuming she has inadequate insurance, she can sue her advisers for failing to reasonably advise her of her insurance needs.

But what about the defendants?

The defendants might argue that she was the author of her own misfortune. That she was the careless one. That she invited this danger. She endlessly paraded around her jewels. She bragged to the world about her whereabouts. She took picture after picture of herself wearing expensive diamonds. She invited cameras to capture her in all of her wealth. And she pursued constant attention from television, to books, to pictures, to apps, to selfies, to Instagram, to Snapchat, to Twitter, and beyond. Thereby allowing the perpetrators to plan the perfect scheme.

Injury aside, I look forward to the reality tv show “Kardashian vs the Hotel: the saga of the stolen jewellery”. They say it will be her best work to date.

 

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