Can Algorithms Save the Courts?

kidney-donation

Algorithms are behind the most sophisticated kidney exchange programs in the world. In Canada, the Canadian Blood Services has built a national Living Donor Paired Exchange Registry. The Registry helps incompatible living donors receive a kidney transplant.

Pairs are matched by comparing the medical information from all pairs in the database and by identifying pairs that might be able to exchange donors. The Registry may also identify a series of pairs that could exchange kidneys in a chain like fashion.

As you can imagine pairing kidney donors can become quite complicated. Algorithms help untangle the madness. Algorithms are a process or set of rules to be followed in problem-solving operations.

We are constantly bemoaning the lack of resources funneled to the judiciary. Perhaps algorithms can be created and applied to stretch the limited resources of our courts, from matching judges to courtrooms, cases to judges, etc. in an efficient way. And also by creating algorithms to decide simple disputes that are regularly before the courts and tribunals.

For example, common interlocutory motions or types of small claims can be solved by using algorithms.  Ideally, the algorithms would be run by computers, reducing the amount of resources required in the long run.

(Views expressed in this blog are my own and do not reflect the views of any organization.)

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